Luis Bruni & Pascale Coquigny  Luis Bruni et Pascale Coquigny




 L’Académie Esprit Tango
 Les pratiques
 Cours et stages de Pascale Coquigny et Luis Bruni
 Tous les cours de l’Académie
 Contact
 Lettre d’information



 Luis Bruni
 Pascale Coquigny
 Maestros


Priorités de l’enseignement - Tango Fusion - Technique de saut - Travail chorégraphique


El Pibe Palermo - El Turco Jose - La milonga « traspié » - Les piliers du tango - Liens - Murga portègne


Vidéo « Two for tango »


El Farolito (France) - Ouest France - Delo (Slovénie) - Explore Dance (USA) - El Tangauta - Elle - Elle à Paris - Guide Balado - Juste Debout - La Salida (France) - Libération - Tango Noticias (USA) - Toutango

 

English

 

Tango Noticias (USA)

A Musical Profile : Juan Carlos Caceres

Tango Noticias de Chicago dédie son numéro 5 du mois de mars 2004 à Juan Carlos Caceres.

(JPEG)

Caceres is a gifted composer, singer, musician, painter, and historian - a modern renaissance man. By bringing back the forgotten elements of the past he has attempted to renew tango music. Sharing what he knows and what he has learned about the tango and its roots with others through workshops, conferences, concerts, and exhibits he has been creating a new movement in tango. While his work may seem too radical for some tangueros, it is spreading quickly to tango communities worldwide. Perhaps the future of tango lies in the exploration of tango’s history.

The first time I heard Caceres’ music I was in Buenos Aires. I was at the milonga Niño Bien and Daniel Garcia and his partner Elina Roldán performed to "Tango Negro". At the time I had no idea what I was listening to. I assumed it was some fabulous music from Buenos Aires that hadn’t made its way to my community yet. So, I began to ask people for the musician’s name. I found out his name was Caceres and armed with that information I began to search for his CD in every CD store I could find. Absolutely nobody had it. One vendor told me that Cacérès was from Uruguay and that they don’t sell "foreign tango" music in Buenos Aires. Most other vendors just said they didn’t have it. I was shocked because it seemed like almost every milonga DJ in Buenos Aires played it either for dancing or as the cortina between the tandas. It wasn’t until I returned home to the US that I was able to obtain a copy of Caceres’ CD or find out anything about him.

(JPEG)
Juan Carlos Caceres in rehearsal with Luis Bruni.

As is turns out, Juan Carlos Caceres is not from Uruguay. He was born in Buenos Aires in 1936 and has been living in Paris since 1968 pursuing his many talents. Caceres is not only a successful musician but also an accomplished painter. He studied art in Buenos Aires and has exhibited his work regularly around the world for the past forty years. In fact, his paintings are on the covers of many of his CDs such as "Tocá Tangó".

Caceres is well-known in Europe as an accomplished jazz musician. He plays the piano, the trumpet, and drums, in addition to singing with his characteristic gravely voice. However, jazz is not the only musical genre that Cacérès feels passionate about. He is also extremely dedicated to the tango. It is said that Juan Carlos Cacérès spread tango around the "Quartier Latin" influencing the musicians who created the bands Malon, Gotan, and Tangofon.

One thing that Cacérès has dedicated a lot of energy toward is the history of tango music’s development. He studies tango music from what he considers part of its earliest stages of development : the African rhythms and traditions of candombe, the carnival milonga, and the murga porteña. He has been actively disproving the mainstream history of the tango that is in denial of its African roots. One way he has been doing this is by creating new music with the black heritage of Argentina in mind. If you listen to the songs from his CDs "Tango Negro" or "Tocá Tangó" you will hear some politically charged lyrics that speak of his respect for the African culture that influenced music and dance in Buenos Aires as well as the black people who suffered.

Some of Caceres’ music has been influenced by his research on the "murga porteña". The murga is the name of a combination of elements that make the spectacle of carnaval in Buenos Aires what it is : the dance, the team of dancers, the music, the drummers, the colorful musical processions and the clothes. The murga’s early history is related to the presence of African slaves. By the beginning of the twentieth century the carnaval was made up of Italian and Spanish immigrants who paraded in the streets with horse drawn wagons decorated as carriages. In 1976 the murga was outlawed by the military regime and was forced to go underground. Today you can see teams of murga performers in the streets, although not to the scale they have in Brazil. Recently, the murga has emerged from the carnaval and can be heard and danced year round, especially in shows in Buenos Aires where the murga is performed. The subject matter of the murga lyrics used to be against politics which was why the military did not approve. Today the lyrics reflect particular current issues such as political scandals or even fashion. In general the murga is used as a kind of catharsis for the problems of the Argentine people.

(JPEG)

Luis Bruni and Pascale Coquigny, tango instructors and performers who are based in Paris, have been organizing workshops with Caceres to allow tango dancers to discover what they believe to be at tango’s source.

Currently in Paris, Juan Carlos Caceres is exploring the murga music and the wild movements of the murguero (murga dancer) with tangueros. Luis Bruni and Pascale Coquigny, tango instructors and performers who are based in Paris, have been organizing workshops with Caceres to allow tango dancers to discover what they believe to be at tango’s source. In October 2003, Luis, Pascale, Juan Carlos and Ariel Prat (a murga artist) conducted a special workshop exploring the African rhythms of the murga and its relationship to the tango. Luis Bruni believes that the grounded beat and relaxed, deep rhythm of the murga can teach tango dancers a great deal about particular musical concepts which are difficult to grasp in tango. This workshop was the first time the common ground between the murga and tango was presented. In Buenos Aires, the murga remains relatively marginal and its relationship to the tango is unknown or possibly denied. The artists who practice the murga do not connect with the people who practice tango. The only person who has made the musical connection between the murga and the tango has been Caceres. Working with Luis and Pascale, he has been able to bring together the murga musical and dance connections to the tango.

Cacérès’ belief in the African roots of tango can clearly be heard in "Tango Negro" and "Tocá Tangó". Besides the highly descriptive lyrics, the voices and the drumbeats are reminiscent of the black musicians and the whistles remind the listener of Carnaval. Cacérès has just returned to Buenos Aires to continue work on his current CD which will be dedicated to the murga.

Caceres is a gifted composer, singer, musician, painter, and historian - a modern renaissance man. By bringing back the forgotten elements of the past he has attempted to renew tango music. Sharing what he knows and what he has learned about the tango and its roots with others through workshops, conferences, concerts, and exhibits he has been creating a new movement in tango. While his work may seem too radical for some tangueros, it is spreading quickly to tango communities worldwide. Perhaps the future of tango lies in the exploration of tango’s history.

(GIF)

Bibliography

Bruni, Luis (2003) "Murga porteña : ‘the catharsis of tango’" in El Farolito, no. 6, November.

Bruni, Luis and Pascale Coquigny, telephone conversation, 25 February, 2004.

Bruni, Luis. Various articles at www.pascaleyluis.com/english.html

Nobécourt, Sophie (2003) "A touch of folly in tango" in El Farolito, no. 6, November.

"Juan Carlos Cacérès" in press release for Menton, ma ville est tango du 17 au 20 juillet 2003

(JPEG)

Sarah R. Graff

 

Print    Top